Tag Archives: pilates physical therapy

Pelvic Floor Health in NYC

Pelvic Floor Health in NYC

COREY SILBERT IS A PHYSICAL THERAPIST AND CO-OWNER OF “BEYOND BASICS” , A CLINIC THAT SPECIALIZES IN ALL CONDITIONS AFFECTING THE PELVIC FLOOR IN MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN. WE LOVE THIS AT MONGOOSE BODYWORKS, AS SO MUCH OF OUR PILATES CORE WORK IS RELATED TO THE PELVIC FLOOR.

HALLE: Tell me a bit about your practice .

COREY: We specialize in treating all conditions affecting the pelvic floor in men, women and children.  We are a manually based clinic and treat patients one-on-one for an hour.

HALLE: How did you come to focus on women’s health and pelvic floor issues ?

COREY: I had been treating orthopedic injuries for some time and was seeing more and more complex cases of back pain, hip pain, etc that didn’t resolve with traditional PT.  In treating these patients I started to feel that the source of their pain was coming from something else, something I didn’t understand completely, the pelvic floor.  I had the opportunity in 2015 to work and train with Amy Stein who has revolutionized the pelvic floor field in New York City.  I decided that I really needed to train more and understand this region of the body better so that I could help these patients.

HALLE: Who can benefit from this type of therapy ?

COREY: Any individual who is having pain or discomfort in their pelvic region, which is the area from the top of your pelvis to your sit bones.  This includes the Sacroiliac region as well as the groin.  We can help patients who are having genital pain, or pain with intercourse.  We also treat issues with bladder which can be incontinence after a vaginal delivery, or increased urgency and frequency incomplete emptying which can affect women and men.  We also see a lot of patients who are having pain with bowel movements or constipation, bloating, and pain.  We also have pretty much seen it all, so we can offer insight if PT has not worked in the past, or a patient wants to know if their complaints are muscle/joint related.  We treat the hard cases, the people who tried traditional PT for their hip or groin pain and the exercises either made them worse or didn’t help.

HALLE: Do you think people are ever embarrassed to contact you?

CORY\: I hope not.  We are all very approachable and we offer phone consults if a person wants to know if PT can help or if they are a candidate for Pelvic Physical Therapy.

HALLE: Why do you love this work?

COREY: I feel I have a special skill set and knowledge where I can help a lot of people where their symptoms are scary and distressing and they have not been able to get the answers or treatment they need.  The symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction can be scary and these patients get bounced around from doctor to doctor without getting answers.  I also feel like I have a lot of tools at this point, I have spent a lot of time taking continuing education classes to learn new ways that I can help.

HALLE: What gets you out of bed in the morning?

COREY: My brain is always going, I am have always wanted to understand how things work.  I used to take apart VCRs and radios when I was a kid because I wanted to see how it worked.  I feel the same way about the body.  I want to understand how everything works together and is related to the whole so that we are pain free and functional.

HALLE: Do you have a favorite exercise?

COREY: I really like to roll my arches on a pinky ball.  I have really tight feet and calves and I am on my feet all day so it feels really good to do that at night when I get home.

HALLE: What’s your experience with Pilates? Do you have a favorite Pilates exercise?

CORY: I have been doing private pilates now for a little over a year.  It has really changed how I move and my posture.  I feel stronger through my core and better grounded when I am working.  I don’t know if I have a favorite exercise, but I do know which one kicks my butt the most!  I have never been able to do a complete curl up/roll up.  Using the arc and roll down bar I can finally do it (with a little help from the bar).  I also found out that my whole life I was doing the ab curl wrong and it has been very enlightening to learn how to do it correctly and also to work through my own limitations that prevented me from being able to do it correctly.

HALLE: How does Pilates relate to your work?

COREY: In doing Pilates myself, I have learned so much the benefits of working with a skilled Pilates instructor to identify my own limitations and also learn how to correctly activate the correct muscles.  In the work I do I find that eventually all my patients get to a point where I have been able to restore normal muscle tension through their pelvic floor muscles, abdomen, hips, and spine, and now they need to start to learn how to use these muscles in an optimal alignment and what better to do that than pilates!  The women who teach Pilates are masters of observation and I trust them entirely to make sure my patients are not compensating with the exercises.  It is the compensations that occur, when we don’t even realize it, that get us into trouble in the long run.

HALLE: What do you do when you are not being a PT?

COREY: I am a knitter and a foodie!

HALLE: Anything you’d like to share about home life?

COREY: I have a wonderful husband, who is also a PT, he is an amazing teacher in regards to PT, but it is more his teaching me to not be a PT all the time that has really done so much for my work life balance.

THANKS COREY!!!

The Connection Between Low Back Pain and Weak Gluteals: Part 2

Low Back Pain and Weak Gluteals: Part 2  

Welcome to part II of a three part series about weakness in the gluteal muscles and the relationship to low back pain . In part I  I discussed what can mechanically happen in the body when the Gluteus Medius (a lateral gluteal muscle) presents weak. This blog outlines the imbalances that can occur when the Gluteus Maximus, the largest of the gluteal  muscles, is weak or inhibited due to tight hip flexors. 

Second picture shows what happens when the hamstrings predominant.

The Gluteus maximus ( GMax) is a powerful hip extensor responsible for getting you up out of a chair and propelling you through space when running or jumping . If your hip flexors ( the muscles in front of your hip- rectus femoris , iliopsoas, and anterior fibers of the adductors ) are short , perhaps from spending much of the day sitting ,  your Gmax can become inhibited and weak. In addition, to sufficiently extend the leg behind you with tight hip flexors the pelvis has to roll forward in an anterior rotation. This positioning causes the hamstrings ( the muscles down the back of your thigh) to predominate which in turn sends the femur into the anterior hip capsule.   Potentially causing anterior hip pain .

Sacrum during gait

When walking the two pelvic halves move in opposition. While one rolls anterior the other rolls posterior relatively. The sacrum , the bone at the end of the spine and between the two pelvic halves, rotates and side bends to accommodate the opposing movements of the pelvic halves  and the lumbar spine counter rotates to balance the system out. If one side of the pelvis is stuck in anterior rotation (as described above )the other  pelvic half may posterior rotate farther to try and create balance. This increased motion between the sacrum and the lumbar spine puts undue stress on the lumbar discs potentially creating injury and nerve compression .

Stretching the hip flexors is an important part to rebalancing but also needs to be accompanied with gluteus maximus re-training that teaches proper recruitment .  At Mongoose Bodyworks in NYC soho we teach clients to balance their low back and pelvic musculature to achieve and maintain a pain free body.

Contact us for an appointment today!

Mongoose Bodyworks

594 Broadway #904

New York, NY 10012

Info@mongoosebw.com

212 431 8377


Mongoose Bodyworks is a boutique Pilates studio in soho NYC that focuses on delivering private session designed for your exact needs.

Halle is a 2nd generation master teacher having studied  closely with two of the great NYC protégés of Joseph Pilates: Kathy Grant and Romana Krysanowska. Halle opened Mongoose Bodyworks, a boutique Pilates Studio in New York City in 1999 .

As well as training in Pilates Halle has pursued studies in ideokensiology, anatomy , biomechanics, muscle energy technique, trigger point therapy ,neuromuscular re-patterning, Alexander technique, The Feldenkrais Method, Polartity therapy and Cranio-Sacral Therapy. She has additional certifications from the PMA-CPT and ACE. Halle integrates all of her extensive studies of the body into her work as a New York Pilates Instructor and Teacher Trainer.

She has been conducting Pilates Teacher Trainings for Balanced Body since 2006 both in New York and around the country. Halle has taught Master Pilates classes nationally and internationally, including at The PMA Conference and Mind Body Expo.


Related Links:

Low Back Pain and Weak Gluteals Part 1

Pilates and Physical Therapy

Back Pain Relief in Soho NYC

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Low back pain and Pilates

Low back Pain and the Gluteals

Clinical studies have shown that a majority of low back pain can be traced to weak and inhibited gluteal muscles . There are three gluteal muscles that make up the side and back of the hip and pelvic region: gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus. The following blog describes how a dysfunctional gluteus medius can specifically contribute to low back pain.

The glute med is a lateral hip muscle that is responsible for keeping the pelvis level when standing on one leg. For example if you are standing on your right leg and have trouble keeping your left hip from dropping your right glute med is not doing it’s job. What the body often does to compensate for this is lean to the right , creating a side bend in the lumbar spine . Although in itself not an invalid motion but repeated over and over again during the gait cycle can cause a lot of problems. Side bending to the right compresses the facet joints on the right, forces the intervertebral discs to the left potentially impacting nerves as they exit the spine, puts a stretch strain through the left  iliolumbar ligament and facet joints and encourages the left quadratus lumborum (low back muscle) to work overtime. Any of these compensations could be a source of pain. And although massage and stretching may temporarily relieve the pain until the right glute med is strengthened, the back pain will return.

At Mongoose Bodyworks in NYC we use the Pilates Method seamlessly combined with contemporary bio-mechanical knowledge to undo muscles imbalances and keep you pain free. Contact us at info@mongoosebw.com or 212 431 8377 to make an appointment. See you at the studio !

Halle Clarke

594 Broadway ( between Houston and Prince)

New York City, New York 10012

Mongoose Bodyworks is a boutique Pilates studio in soho NYC that focuses on delivering customized private sessions designed for your exact needs.

Halle is a 2nd generation master teacher having studied  closely with two of the great NYC protégés of Joseph Pilates: Kathy Grant and Romana Krysanowska. Halle opened Mongoose Bodyworks, a boutique Pilates Studio in New York City in 1999 .

As well as training in Pilates Halle has pursued studies in ideokensiology, anatomy , biomechanics, muscle energy technique, trigger point therapy ,neuromuscular re-patterning, Alexander technique, The Feldenkrais Method, Polartity therapy and Cranio-Sacral Therapy. She has additional certifications from the PMA-CPT and ACE. Halle integrates all of her extensive studies of the body into her work as a New York based Pilates Instructor and Teacher Trainer.

She has been conducting Pilates Teacher Trainings for Balanced Body since 2006 both in New York and around the country. Halle has taught Master Pilates classes nationally and internationally, including at The PMA Conference and Mind Body Expo.

Pilates and Physical Therapy

Pilates And Physical Therapy: A Two-Part Approach

 Pilates and physical therapy. Two separate disciplines with different objectives, right?

 

In truth, Pilates and physical therapy (PT) have much in common – including a history rooted in building strength and maintaining mobility. Although the approaches may differ based on skill sets; pain free function and individual attention are two of many common threads that link the two disciplines.

Pain Free Function :The most important connection between Pilates and PT

For physical therapists, the approach to pain begins with pathology: searching for the structural drivers, both neuromuscular and articular, of a patient’s pain. PTs can then use techniques like manual therapy, strength training and movement re-patterning to help eliminate pain. Somewhat surprisingly, the practice of Pilates was also born out of a desire to help individuals recover from painful injuries. In fact, Joseph Pilates’ first innovation was attaching springs to hospital beds to help bedridden patients build strength. Still today Pilates maintains a place in the physical rehabilitative community for addressing pain.

Both modalities look to improve alignment, joint articulation and mobility, movement control and fluidity as means to becoming pain free. Because of this major overlap in objectives Pilates acts as an ideal transition out of PT and back into movement and sports.

 Individual Attention : Another link between Pilates and physical therapy? They’re built on the idea of a close relationship.

A physical therapist is a licensed medical professional. They diagnose and treat injuries – with the goal of eliminating pain. Of course, this calls for an open and intimate relationship with their patient.

Likewise, Pilates instructors are frequently tasked with developing new movement strategies and approaches based on observing their client’s unique movement patterns which also requires a very individual and personal relationship with their client.

A Path Towards Better Health?

When practiced together, Pilates and physical therapy can truly be the cornerstone of an overall recovery and health plan. With a shared focus on eliminating pain and restoring function through personal attention, the two modalities are not just complimentary but collaborative. When both practitioners are working in collaboration they can more effectively re-educate patients away from movement compensations that may cause a return of pain and dysfunction. We have found at Thrive PT and Mongoose Bodyworks Pilates that an open dialogue between PT and Pilates instructor has guaranteed the success of our patients and clients.

 Recover And Rebuild With Experts

 If you are interested in exploring Pilates or physical therapy in NYC soho, you need guidance from comprehensively trained professionals. Mongoose Bodyworks Pilates and Thrive Physical Therapy can help you recover and rebuild, even in the wake of an injury. With open atmospheres, and highly qualified staff, there are few better places to begin your recovery or fitness journey. You’ll be able to build strength, increase flexibility, and enjoy a more mobile life.

To get started with a consultation, contact Thrive Physical Therapy and Mongoose Bodyworks Pilates , New York, Soho.

 

 

Pilates and Scoliosis in Soho NYC

Pilates and Scoliosis in Soho NYC

Scoliosis is a medical condition involving sideways curvatures of the spine.  When looking at the spine from behind a scoliotic spine makes either an “S” or “C” shape instead of a straight vertical line. Scoliosis usually begins in adolescence but may also develop in adulthood. A diagnosis can be  confirmed by an X-ray that demonstrates lateral deviations of ten degrees or more. However, even smaller non-scoliotic curvatures  may be a source of physical discomfort.

scoli2

The cause of most scoliosis is unknown but it is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors and can be related to neuromuscular conditions such as cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy. Structural Scoliosis refers to structural changes in the vertebrae that create a “fixed” curvature. Functional Scoliosis is essentially a severe muscular imbalance as the underlying spine is physically normal. Scoliosis is often a combination of the two.

The lateral curves that characterize scoliosis are accompanied by rotations in the sagittal and transverse planes, causing the spine to spiral and alter the transmission of forces from head to toe. These 3-dimensional rotations appear as one hip higher than the other, uneven shoulders and prominent ribs on one side. The physical imbalances can cause pain in the low back, ribcage and neck and well as nerve symptoms down one leg. Pilates can help relieve the physical pain and spasming that can result from scoliosis by unwinding  these 3 dimension spirals through elongation of the spine, centering the torso and creating more muscular balance throughout the body as a whole.

scoliosis-1-768x445

Pilates teaches exercises that create natural length in the spine through muscular engagement, so the spine can be “pulled” out of these spirals. The curves themselves also must be directly addressed as there is often muscular hypertrophy on the long side of the curve due to the body trying to right itself. Pilates teachers are trained to teach with the specificity that is necessary for correcting and managing the curvatures. Once the deviations are lessened then the core is strengthened  to help  “set” the changes.  A functional/muscular scoliosis will respond very successfully to a Pilates program. A  structural scoliosis cannot be undone but can be  to be managed very effectively with Pilates so that painful muscular compensations don’t get out of control.

At Mongoose Bodyworks we have helped clients with both structural and functional scoliosis with great success. We have brought our clients much  relief and improved well being. Please contact us with any questions you may have about your body.